By Patterson Toby Graham

ISBN-10: 0817311440

ISBN-13: 9780817311445

ISBN-10: 0817313354

ISBN-13: 9780817313357

ISBN-10: 0817353712

ISBN-13: 9780817353711

A dramatic bankruptcy in American cultural historical past.    * Winner of the Alabama Library Association’s Alabama writer Award for Nonfiction   Patterson Toby Graham is Director of the electronic Library of Georgia on the collage of Georgia in Athens.

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Extra resources for A Right to Read: Segregation and Civil Rights in Alabama's Public Libraries, 1900-1965

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This was the only way they could have realistically been expected to be maintained in Depression-era Alabama, and in some ways the practice resembled the de facto segregation in place in other parts of America. Still, the demonstration in Walker County, along with the ten other library systems in the South similarly involved in the Fund’s efforts, represented substantial progress within the parameters of segregation. It was a signi¤cant accomplishment for rural blacks to acquire library service when it was not available to the preponderance of whites in rural Alabama.

Walker County was also required to provide housing for the libraries; the Rosenwald Fund did not pay construction costs. 8 Superintendent Moore submitted a request to the Rosenwald Fund on January 31, 1930. In his application, Moore assured the Fund administrators that he had managed to secure funds from the county and 30 / Chapter Two the state totaling $12,500 for the ¤rst year. He asserted that this appropriation would be large enough to serve all the people of the county regardless of race.

These were individuals who amassed vast fortunes during the Gilded Age and the years after. Their sponsorship of libraries was so important to the South because, according to library historian Donald G. , the region probably never would have entered the public library movement but for philanthropic support. Though less so than other states in the region, Alabama gained from this brand of benefaction. Birmingham, Montgomery, and Selma, among others, built library structures with Carnegie money. These Carnegie libraries were for whites only, however.

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A Right to Read: Segregation and Civil Rights in Alabama's Public Libraries, 1900-1965 by Patterson Toby Graham


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